Give moms and babies a chance at a healthy future.

"I worried that I might be carrying a girl and what would her care be like if she also suffers from HG? What if her HG is worse than mine?  Will I lose my daughter to this illness?  Will my friends lose their daughters?"  - Jacqueline

Policy Initiatives

Protecting mothers and babies is our priority. 1 MOM focuses 20 years of leadership towards federal and state policies to support long-term health and improve outcomes for those suffering with Hyperemesis Gravidarum (HG) and associated complications in order to eradicate preventable maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality.

What is HG?

Hyperemesis gravidarum (HG) is a potentially life-threatening pregnancy disease that may cause weight loss, malnutrition, dehydration, and debility due to severe nausea and/or vomiting and may cause long-term health issues for mother and baby(ies).

  • HG accounts for over 330,000 emergency and inpatient visits compared to 149,000 for preeclampsia, 18,000 for sepsis, and 8,000 for cardiomyopathy (HCUP 2014).

Maternal Complications

HG increases maternal risk of malnutrition, Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE), sepsis, thiamin deficiency (TD), preeclampsia, hemorrhage, preterm labor, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), Perinatal Mood and Anxiety Disorders (PMAD), embolism, peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM), and placental abruption.

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  • HG is the leading cause for hospital and emergency visits in early pregnancy, and the second leading cause overall, costing over $3 billion annually plus outpatient care and therapeutics.

Fetal Complications

HG increases fetal risk of Intrauterine Growth Restriction or Small for Gestational Age (IUGR/SGA), prematurity, neurodevelopmental issues, autism spectrum disorder, speech and language delay, Sensory Processing Disorder, learning disabilities, adult mental health issues, and adult cardiometabolic issues. 1 in 3 HG pregnancies does not make it to term.

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TAKE ACTION

General Recommendations

  • Implement international consensus HG definition to improve diagnosis and tracking of HG cases and costs. 
  • Differentiate HG from morning sickness in databases and research projects for expansion of outcomes data.

Recommendations for Policymakers

Recommendations for Health Departments

Recommendations for Societies and Clinicians

 

Maria's Story

Amy's Story

Babies that will not make it to term
%
Women who meet full PTSD criteria
%
Women who experience negative psychosocial impacts
%
Rate of recurrence in a subsequent pregnancy
%

Facts about HG

HG is defined as a potentially life-threatening pregnancy disease causing weight loss, malnutrition, dehydration, and debility due to severe nausea and/or vomiting, and often contributes to long-term health issues for mother and babies.

"Maria's death was due to medical neglect and ignorance, things HG moms face far too often. We aren’t believed, we aren’t treated, and we lose our children as a result. But right in our faces, we lost a sister. Maria’s death was preventable."

HG accounts for over 330,000 emergency and inpatient visits compared to 149,000 for preeclampsia, 18,000 for sepsis, and 8,000 for cardiomyopathy (HCUP 2014).

HG is the leading cause for hospital and emergency visits in early pregnancy, and the second leading cause overall, costing over $3 billion annually plus outpatient care and therapeutics.

According to recent research, 10% to over 22% of pregnant women take antiemetics for nausea and vomiting of pregnancy, yet only 3% are diagnosed with HG, suggesting that HG is significantly underdiagnosed.

Maternal complications can include gastrointestinal and esophageal damage, liver and kidney failure, preterm birth, placental abruption, sepsis, preeclampsia, embolism, PTSD, and PMADs.

Fetal complications can include restricted growth, neurodevelopmental delays, autism spectrum disorders, as well as cardiometabolic disease and mental health issues in adulthood.